Growth of Security Education in the Medical Industry

I recently had an opportunity to address a group of Security Managers from several large Medical Facilities on the growth of education for security professionals in the health care industry, evaluation of resumes of prospective applicants, and the growth of education in the larger society. The up board result 2018 if that meeting is well worth repeating here.

The group consisted of security directors from several of the largest medical facilities in Western Washington. They ranged in age from their early thirties too well into the baby boomer retirement generation. These were all season professionals with an impressive string of credentials. Yet, they were as perplexed and confused about the future of education and their industry as the general public is about education in general. Our discussion started with a brief overview of how the security professional in the healthcare industry had evolved over the last 100 years. Starting in the 1890s we looked at medical facilities and healthcare professionals. The medical facility of the 1890 east and the early 1900s was largely a nonprofit institution, set up by local or regional political forces to serve the needs of growing population. They consisted of a group of doctors and nurses providing generalized healthcare. The buildings and surrounding structures were largely the result of donations, or tax levies from local towns and counties to create health districts and facilities. The security professional used to protect these facilities was likewise an uncomplicated individual. They were largely young to middle age people who had little more than a high school diploma and primarily used as a night watchman to watch the facilities during low usage times to prevent damage and fire. I then moved the discussion forward to the year 2011 and the modern medical facilities today. Those facilities are generally very complex and sophisticated facilities involving research from areas of nanotechnology and genetics, to the study of many different diseases. They often involved very sophisticated equipment and Computer Systems with millions of dollars being invested in the personnel that will operate these facilities. They are multibillion dollar complexes, profit driven, with huge amounts of physical resources to be protected. Looking at the security professional that is employed in that industry today, we see very little change between the modern individual and the one that existed in the 1800s. They’re still primarily young, with little more than a high school diploma for education and are used primarily to monitor facilities and to prevent fire damage. As I explained to this group of factional managers, we need to move the discussion for security professionals away from the eighteen hundreds model and into the modern age.

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